A Curious Affinity For Blue: In Conversation With Street Artist Myneandyours

Myneandyours is known for stickers, wheat paste, and murals of clouds, all in a recognizable shade of blue. Myne is based in Dubai, but was raised in London with Iraqi roots. He came up listening to punk music, going to gigs, and skateboarding on city streets, all of which led to street art. Now a full time artist with a studio at Tashkeel, an artists’ incubator and community set in Dubai, Myne recently completed a mural in Tunisia as part of the #Djerbahood project, a remarkable initiative organized by Galerie Itinerance, bringing some of the world’s top street artists to paint walls on the tiny Tunisian island of Djerba.

Fly High, Great Eastern St, Shoreditch, London, 2014, Photo Credit Monoprixx

Fly High, Great Eastern St, Shoreditch, London, 2014, Photo Credit Monoprixx

I sat down with Myneandyours at Dubai’s trendy A4 community space to talk street art, mythology, and technique. Here is the conversation that followed:

DL:Mabrook (congratulations!) on your recent trip to Djerba. Tell me about your experience.

MY: We painted in Erriadh, a small town outside the city center. The temperatures were so boiling hot that all the work was done at night. When I was painting I had the owner of the house [who had offered his wall to me], his brother and son bringing me food throughout the night. I painted from 9pm-9am. The owner’s brother and teenage nephew dragged out a mattress, played Umm Kulthum, chain-smoked, and ate pistachios to keep me company the entire time.

DL: You ultimately chose to paint a mural featuring a local Berber woman. Why did this image feel like the right choice?

MY:In the Odyssey, Odysseus stops along his journey back to Troy on an island that is now believed to be Djerba. The island is inhabited by the Lotus Eaters who feed on the fruit from the lotus flower, which makes them sleepy, apathetic, and able to get through the day. I wanted to leave something behind that related to our local hosts so I chose to paint a local Berber woman with a lotus flower.

A trio of public bathroom doors painted during the Djerba Hood Project in Tunisia, 2014

A trio of public bathroom doors painted during the Djerba Hood Project in Tunisia, 2014

The Fruit of the Lotus, Djerba, Tunisia, 2014

The Fruit of the Lotus, Djerba, Tunisia, 2014

DL: Why do you have a curious affinity for blue? It turns up in all your work.

MY: I wanted to create an identity and consistency between my work. I began with the blue cloud, which I incorporate into almost everything I do. I don’t like to sign my work so the blue is in lieu of my name in most cases.

DL: You’re best known for your clouds. When did you draw your first cloud?

MY: About 7 years ago, it started out as a doodle for a friend who wanted to get a tattoo. Then I started putting it up on buildings and making stickers of the cloud, which I’d put up all over London. My mom is so cool that she pastes my stickers all over New York City. The symbol means different things to everyone, but from a scientific perspective, through the cycle of condensation we are all connected to the clouds and the environment.

A screenshot from Myne's laptop demonstrating the technical process he goes through when creating a mural. The final piece appears deceptively simple and spontaneous.

A screenshot from Myne’s laptop demonstrating the technical process he goes through when creating a mural. The final piece appears deceptively simple and spontaneous.

DL: That’s the beauty of street art. You’re affecting people without really realizing it and the work takes on a life of its own, long after you’ve left it.

MY: Some pieces I put up just to be provocative. I come back and they’ve been painted over or removed. I find it inspirational that my work caused someone to think and take action.

When I go out at night, I pre-paint 3 meters on paper. I take wheat flour paste, a huge, extendable brush and I climb a building and put the work up. I pre-print because I don’t want to rush or make a mess and if someone doesn’t want it to be there, it’s just paper and anyone can take it down. I like that it’s temporary.

DL: There’s something very Zen about that.

MY: Yeah. It makes it very exciting to come back in a year and see if it’s still there.

Great Eastern St, London, July, 2014, Billboard

Great Eastern St, London, July, 2014, Billboard

DL: I don’t place much importance on labels, but would you call yourself a graffiti artist?

MY: Graffiti is something different from what I do. Those artists are writers who are speaking to one another on the wall. Those guys are amazing but that’s not me. In Dubai I only paint outside legally, I knock on doors and ask permission. I’m searching for a big wall, something dirty and grimy that I can hit here.

DL: You relocated to Dubai last year and became full time artist. What was your previous day job?

MY: Back in London I used to have a day job in an office directing marketing for a certain pizza franchise. I sat in a cubicle. My wife Reem would compare me to Superman. I’d wear a suit and tie by day but at night I’d sneak out with my bucket and paper to scale a building.

DL: Do you sketch your work out beforehand or encounter it for the first time when you’re face to face with a wall?

MY: If you analyze my work on a mathematical level it makes sense. It becomes like an OCD thing—I’m working 6000% on the screen. No one will ever see what I see, but I’m doing it for me because I want to produce something that is perfect. So many artists are more spontaneous and just throw paint on a wall and see what happens. That’s amazing, but I’m not like that.

It will be ok, Sclater St, Shoreditch, London, July, 2014 Photo Credit - Mark Hat.

It will be ok, Sclater St, Shoreditch, London, July, 2014 Photo Credit – Mark Hat.

DL: Let’s talk stickers. Your clouds are all over cities in the UK and Middle East. How did you become a sticker artist?

MY: When I’m out and walking down the street, holding my wife’s hand on the way to a restaurant, my mind is still with Myneandyours, and I am always hiding a sticker in my other hand, looking for right place to attach it.

DL: Does that come from a desire for people to see your work all over the city?

MY: It’s not so much about making people see my work, but about awakening a sense of wonder for our environment. If someone sees the cloud pasted to a building and then again as a sticker on the street signal, she will begin to question how it got there and what it means. It’s not advertising because the cloud isn’t pushing a product or idea and there is no signature or website. I’m hoping to cause people to realize how frequently we’re just pushed into an idea without questioning what is really behind it.

Marylebone, London, 2012

Marylebone, London, 2012

It's all in my head, Putney, South London, 2012

It’s all in my head, Putney, South London, 2012

DL: Where did your tag, Myne and Yours originate?

MY: I create the work for me, I put it outside for you. But it’s also about how this life is ours to do with what we want. You don’t have to sit in a cubicle all day if you don’t want to.

DL: Many of your pieces are installed several stories up on a building or billboard. Is it precarious for you to hang the wheat paste so high off the ground?

MY: In London the best time to hit a wall with wheat paste is about 4 in the morning when people are still in bed. I sometimes find myself hanging upside down over a ledge alone. I attach the bucket to a 50-meter rope then climb the rope and pull it up.

For commissioned walls everything is first sketched out using Adobe Illustrator. Then I use an MTN 94 can of spray paint with a combination of stencil work with freehand work to get clean lines. I can enjoy the luxury of putting it up over the course of a full day or two and having someone along to keep me from falling.

Ayda, Qarantina, Beirut, 2011

Ayda, Qarantina, Beirut, 2011

Good Ideas: Connect with Myneandyours here

Images: Courtesy of Myneandyours unless otherwise specified in captions